The Female World Cup 2027.

WorldCup---Image-1

We have been discussing the men's world cup on the student hub. We have discussed at length and we have really learnt a lot from this topic.

Now I feel it is time for us to bring in a little divesity into this topic. Let's get talking about the Female World Cup! The female world cup takes place every four years. South Africa is bidding to host this grand event in 2027. This big and grand event hopefully will be held in Africa for the first time since 12 years. As an African, I am really excited for the event. It will be a great opportunity for South Africa and the whole of Africa at large. This will be a good representation of Africa in the world and this is a form of diversity manifesting itself in the women's world cup. This will also be good for South Africa as South Africa will experience an influx of tourists during the event. It will be a huge source of revenue for South Africa and I am sure they are excited.

The chief executive Tebogo Motlanthe of SAFA(South African Football Association) told AFP (Agence France-Presse), "We would love to have the opportunity to roll out the red carpet again in 2027 for the women's tournament,"

If South Africa will end up hosting the world cup in 2027, They will have to start working on how to make the country safe and crime-free so for visitors, build more hotels and accomodations for visitors, make preparations on how to curb the issue of pollution that might be present in the country or may likely occur during the event and to take care of any other thing that might hinder the success of the event. This will be a very big responsibility vested on South Africa as the Women's World Cup is a big event.

Of course everything that has an advantage, also has a disadvantage. Although South Africa will generate a lot of revenue from the event there is also a need to take care of the downsides of this event. The major downside now is making the event more sustainable and climate friendly.

What do you think South Africa can do to take care of the need to have a more sustainable and climate friendly event?

Comments (6)

You must be logged in with Student Hub access to post a comment. Sign up now!

  • accurate_wombat | Rhemaville Christian Academy | Nigeria 07 Dec 2022

    when we say we are a woke century I do not exactly believe that because minor things that need a gender revolution has not been done the world cup being one of them. Look at these statistics, a struggle continues off the soccer pitch that many are not aware of; that is, the struggle against the gaping gender-based pay gap in the industry. According to data published in 2018 by the International Federation of Professional Footballers, 49 percent of professional female soccer players do not receive a salary – even as the industry generated more than $500 billion each year. About 87 percent of players will finish their career before the age of 25, due to low pay or lack of pay. The disparity reaches the highest levels of the sport. While Lionel Messi receives 130 million euros per year, Ada Hegerberg —winner of the first Women’s Ballon d’Or — receives 400,000 euros per year, or 325 times less, this does not even make sense. "Women continue to be considered second-class citizens, and it's not just for the money," says Marion Reimers, a sports journalist for FoxSports América Latina. "Women's football receives what is left over from all the men's teams, so they do not have the materials, support or representation necessary to play. There are even starker examples: in some women's teams, selections have had to use previously worn men’s shirts, and players have had to pay for their own tickets to tournaments. I mean this is not the first time I have heard of this, but it would be nice to see a visible change. People might argue that there is progress, but do we really have a place on the pitch I mean Soccer began as a male sport since its first laws were formulated in 1863. The first women’s match was held nearly three decades later. The rise of women's football did not come until the First World War, however, when women went to work in factories and took advantage of free time to play soccer.
    Its development was interrupted in 1921, when the English Football Federation banned the use of sports venues for matches between women. Women's soccer was benched for almost half a century. It was not until 1971 that the British lifted the ban, and only in 1980 was women’s soccer recognized by FIFA. It took another 11 years for the first women’s soccer tournament to be held.

  • accurate_wombat | Rhemaville Christian Academy | Nigeria 07 Dec 2022

    1

    Another thing I think needs to be adressed is the pay gap between the two genders which play THE SAME SPORT!!!!!!! We need people like Megan Rapinoe who used the world cup to change the way we think about gender equality in sports. "I think there have been strides that have been made, but in terms of (FIFA's) capacity for change and the ability for them to change — obviously they have essentially unlimited resources — I don’t think that it’s really been a huge change at all," Rapinoe told reporters Friday. The change that we think we have seen is not enough and I don’t think that’s really the change that needs to happen. I would like to see a major shift and sort of a major overhaul, realizing that there has been such a lack of investment for all of these years and such a lack of care and attention that double or tripling or quadrupling investment care, attention to the women’s game I think would be appropriate. One example of "incremental change" the fact that FIFA doubled the prize money for the women to $30 million from the amount four years ago, and $4 million will go to the winning team this year. But when you compare that to the men's World Cup, it's significantly less. The winners of the men's World Cup received $38 million from a $400 million pool in 2018, and FIFA has already raised the men's pool to $440 million for 2022. I think it's pretty clear women in sport have not been treated with the same care and financing and all of that that men's sports have. I don't think anyone should be arguing about that anymore, there needs to be more of an effort to differentiate the women's game from the men's game. The NBA is an example what may work in the NBA might not necessarily work in the WNBA. The common mistake that what works for a man can work for a woman is wrong and we see it in football when women’s sports is trying to replicate the change that has been done on the men’s side. I think that a thoughtful approach would be to specify women to the women’s game and that sort of environment around it needs to be taken to bring that game to a higher level. I don’t think you can do exactly what you do on the men’s side and do it on the women’s side. But I think doing the same exact thing has kept women down for a long time is probably not the best way to go about it.

  • accurate_wombat | Rhemaville Christian Academy | Nigeria 08 Dec 2022

    A common stereotype in the sports community is that women’s sports are inferior to men’s sports. Sporting environments have degraded female athletes by constantly holding them to a lower standard than male athletes. They are more likely to be objectified, shamed, and paid less because of another stereotype that men are more athletically gifted. Compared to some sports, male and female athletes are definitely portrayed differently, especially in what they wear. A great sport to compare is football. Although it is considered to be a predominantly male sport, many women do play professional football. Male athletes usually wear gear and padding to help prevent injury. While women’s football, they tend to wear a little more revealing uniforms with not as much protection or padding. It’s confusing because it’s the same sport that could cause the same amount of injury because they’re a different gender, they have to dress differently. It seems that the audience is focusing more on the way they look, instead of how much talent female athletes have. Objectification of women happens in many other sports, such as tennis, volleyball, cheerleading, ice skating, etc. Men and women shouldn’t have to dress according to their gender. They should wear according to how intense the sport is. According to silverstreahonline only 40% of sports participants are women and only 4% of women’s sports have sports media coverage which is quite surprising especially in the 21st century. Having as much media coverage as male athletes would encourage them to stay in sports. Not only does our younger generation have less female athlete role models, but some also lack opportunity and lack experience because funds usually go to boys’ sports, they lack resources which makes it difficult for young girls to engage in sports. The social stigma around female athletes also tends to be very negative and stereotypical. The idea that girls are supposed to be quiet, obedient, feminine is absolutely ridiculous. For years, sports have been considered a “masculine” thing. However, once a girl challenges and confronts the idea, she’s questioned for not being “ladylike.” They’re questioned about their gender identity and sexual orientation because of these stereotypes.
    If a girl wants to play football, let her play football. It goes the same for boys that prefer ballet over other sports. Stereotypes, social constructs, and gender roles are restricting our younger generation from being who they want to be.

  • accurate_wombat | Rhemaville Christian Academy | Nigeria 08 Dec 2022

    Around the world, girls and women face unique challenges to participating in sport. These challenges are personal, practical, economic, political and cultural. In Pakistan, the lack of private space where girls can compete without being seen by men is an obstacle. In Zimbabwe, girls are expected to dance, while football is reserved for men. In order to create a successful sport programme for girls, leaders must first be aware of the challenges.
    Many societies impose constraints on what is considered appropriate attire for girls. In tradition-bound and religious societies, expectations often include mode of dressing. In economically disadvantaged communities, especially in urban areas, there is a lack of sufficient spaces to engage in sport. Girls from economically disadvantaged backgrounds can find the costs associated with equipment, transportation and competition unrealistic for their families. Girls, especially those living in poverty, are often responsible for assisting in caretaking at home, including watching children, doing chores, cooking and cleaning meaning that they have no time to engage in sports. If a girl has never seen women participating in sport, it will be virtually impossible for her to imagine playing herself, the lack of female sports women to model. Sometimes religion is used by conservative societies and institutions to prevent females from participating in sport, why do we keep finding meaningless things to extend the bias among men and women. Sometimes most women just feel insecure, because of how revealing and unprotective women clothing's are, we just feel like we might be objectified, and we have honestly had a lot of that.

  • phenomenal_lion | Govt. Comprehensive Boys High School | Pakistan 15 Dec 2022

    Another thing I think needs to be adressed is the pay gap between the two genders which play THE SAME SPORT!!!!!!! We need people like Megan Rapinoe who used the world cup to change the way we think about gender equality in sports. "I think there have been strides that have been made, but in terms of (FIFA's) capacity for change and the ability for them to change — obviously they have essentially unlimited resources — I don’t think that it’s really been a huge change at all," Rapinoe told reporters Friday. The change that we think we have seen is not enough and I don’t think that’s really the change that needs to happen. I would like to see a major shift and sort of a major overhaul, realizing that there has been such a lack of investment for all of these years and such a lack of care and attention that double or tripling or quadrupling investment care, attention to the women’s game I think would be appropriate. One example of "incremental change" the fact that FIFA doubled the prize money for the women to $30 million from the amount four years ago, and $4 million will go to the winning team this year. But when you compare that to the men's World Cup, it's significantly less. The winners of the men's World Cup received $38 million from a $400 million pool in 2018, and FIFA has already raised the men's pool to $440 million for 2022. I think it's pretty clear women in sport have not been treated with the same care and financing and all of that that men's sports have. I don't think anyone should be arguing about that anymore, there needs to be more of an effort to differentiate the women's game from the men's game. The NBA is an example what may work in the NBA might not necessarily work in the WNBA. The common mistake that what works for a man can work for a woman is wrong and we see it in football when women’s sports is trying to replicate the change that has been done on the men’s side. I think that a thoughtful approach would be to specify women to the women’s game and that sort of environment around it needs to be taken to bring that game to a higher level. I don’t think you can do exactly what you do on the men’s side and do it on the women’s side. But I think doing the same exact thing has kept women down for a long time is probably not the best way to go about it.

  • phenomenal_lion | Govt. Comprehensive Boys High School | Pakistan 15 Dec 2022

    when we say we are a woke century I do not exactly believe that because minor things that need a gender revolution has not been done the world cup being one of them. Look at these statistics, a struggle continues off the soccer pitch that many are not aware of; that is, the struggle against the gaping gender-based pay gap in the industry. According to data published in 2018 by the International Federation of Professional Footballers, 49 percent of professional female soccer players do not receive a salary – even as the industry generated more than $500 billion each year. About 87 percent of players will finish their career before the age of 25, due to low pay or lack of pay. The disparity reaches the highest levels of the sport. While Lionel Messi receives 130 million euros per year, Ada Hegerberg —winner of the first Women’s Ballon d’Or — receives 400,000 euros per year, or 325 times less, this does not even make sense. "Women continue to be considered second-class citizens, and it's not just for the money," says Marion Reimers, a sports journalist for FoxSports América Latina. "Women's football receives what is left over from all the men's teams, so they do not have the materials, support or representation necessary to play. There are even starker examples: in some women's teams, selections have had to use previously worn men’s shirts, and players have had to pay for their own tickets to tournaments. I mean this is not the first time I have heard of this, but it would be nice to see a visible change. People might argue that there is progress, but do we really have a place on the pitch I mean Soccer began as a male sport since its first laws were formulated in 1863. The first women’s match was held nearly three decades later. The rise of women's football did not come until the First World War, however, when women went to work in factories and took advantage of free time to play soccer.
    Its development was interrupted in 1921, when the English Football Federation banned the use of sports venues for matches between women. Women's soccer was benched for almost half a century. It was not until 1971 that the British lifted the ban, and only in 1980 was women’s soccer recognized by FIFA. It took another 11 years for the first women’s soccer tournament to be held.