Meet Dhruti, a Climate Reality Leader who represented India!

cop25 dhruti (1).jpeg

We are delighted to invite Dhruti Chakravarthi to Topical Talk! Thank you to all students who submitted questions for Dhruti. We picked five and you can see Dhruti's responses in the videos below.

Dhruti was chosen to be an observer at COP25 - the last United Nations Climate-change summit, through the University of Edinburgh. According to their website, observers help to interpret what is happening at the COP and explain this to others, amplify the voices of people that aren't being heard, and much more.

Dhruti was selected to represent India as a Climate Reality Leader at a course in Los Angeles, and she also won the Commitment to Sustainability award from her university for outstanding contribution to sustainability in the community.

Dhruti is also the Editor of the University of Edinburgh Student Newspaper. Watch her talk about curiosity (and butterflies!) here.


We're sure you'll agree her answers were fascinating and teach us so much about perspectives, decisions and making a change at climate-change summits.

Dhruti has kindly agreed to take more questions in the comments. So, after watching Dhruti's answers, what other questions do you have for her? Please structure your next questions like this:

"In Dhruti's answers she said...

Therefore, I would like to ask..."


How do we convince the major industrialised nations to give up their profits to save the world from the climate crisis?
empathetic_thought | Beit Hanoun Prep Girls A School | Occupied Palestinian Territory


How can Indian girls step up in the context of climate change?
active_speech | Pabna Cadet College | Bangladesh


Should parents advise their children to enjoy fresh air more instead of playing video games, to feel more connected to nature?
curious_owl | Joypurhat Girls' Cadet College | Bangladesh


Does being an observer at a climate-change summit, and not contribute to the problem-solving process, bother you?
capable_dusk | School of Excellence | India


Where did you observe the most awareness for climate change?
intellectual_glockenspiel | Joypurhat Girls' Cadet College | Bangladesh
We're aware the audio and video is currently out of sync on this video - we'll replace this as soon as we can!


Do all countries agree that decisions should be taken against climate change?
compassionate_explanation | Beit Hanoun Prep Girls A School | Occupied Palestinian Territory and warm_butterfly | Islamabad Model School for Girls (VI-X) G-11/1 | Pakistan


A final message from Dhruti Chakravarthi!


Thank you very much to Dhruti for answering your brilliant questions!

We're sure you'll agree her answers were fascinating and teach us so much about perspectives, decisions and making a change at climate-change summits.

Dhruti has kindly agreed to take more questions in the comments. So, after watching Dhruti's answers, what other questions do you have for her? Please structure your next questions like this:

"In Dhruti's answers she said...

Therefore, I would like to ask..."

Comments (38)

  • British Council.jpg free_river | Faujdarhat Cadet College | Bangladesh
    28 Sep 2021

    "In Dhruti's answers she said... being an observer at a climate-change summit, and not contribute to the problem-solving process, doesn't bother her and said that they can get some idea as an observer. Therefore i would like to ask that isn't there any value of their perspective??.Because we no that many a brilliant mind can come up from the under-developed countries representative , if their perspectives are not count they might be feel disheartened .lastly what's your opinion about the young activist who are now directly questioning the world leaders whose countries are the main cause of climate change .If their opinions are not counted and they join the climate summits as an observer . will that still bother you ??????

    Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg blessed_fact | Faujdarhat Cadet College | Bangladesh
    03 Oct 2021

    In Dhruti's answer, she said "every child deserves a ground a play". Such a valuable answer but with due respect ma'am , that answer is really vague in our country's perspective. Therefore I would like to ask, "what will be the easiest and the shortest way possible to ensure a hygenic,healthy and a clean environment for a child of a developing/2nd world/3rd world country to play in?"

    Reply to this comment
    1. tom Tom @ Topical Talk
      blessed_fact's comment 04 Oct 2021

      Thank you for the question, blessed_fact!

      Reply to this comment
    2. British Council.jpg elated_ladder | Mirzapur Cadet College | Bangladesh
      blessed_fact's comment 06 Oct 2021

      Yes, very well said! Every children has a right to play. But the question is, has every child a playground where he can play? Well, the fact is, in many big cities of the world, there is hardly place for plants to grow, let alone a playground for children to play.
      So, here are some fascinating alternatives which I want to share.
      Firstly, before starting any project or construction planning of a colony or a residential area, the authority must keep a space alloted only for children to play. The society may arrange funds. I believe parents would be happy to see their children playing outside instead of seeing them poking around with video games all day long. So keeping parents in these kinds of plannings may prove effective.
      But what about the places where there is already no space? Is it possible for them to free space for their children by deconstructing? And if that initiative is taken, wouldn't be that hard?
      So, here comes my another handy alternative. Why can't just we use create a play space in the roof/top floor of our apartments and buildings? In this way, little children would be able to spend some time in running, skipping and jumping under fresh air and sunlight. Additional rides such as see-saws, slides or swings can be added for their enjoyment.
      But here comes another problem, what will happen to the elder children and teenagers who want to have some quality sport? The roof/top floor has not that much to offer.
      Well, here comes my last method. How about using the empty basements? Children can easily practice their sports there, and it is very handy. Games such as basketball, cricket, badminton, tennis etc. can easily be played here very easily and conveniently. On top of that, we do not need any additional settings except the sport gears and equipments to create a sports room in the basement.
      So, did you like my ideas? Were those any helpful? Let me know in the comments. Would love to hear from you!

      Reply to this comment
    3. British Council.jpg free_atom | Rafah Prep (B) Girls School | Occupied Palestinian Territory
      blessed_fact's comment 20 Oct 2021

      I listened to Dhruti too.
      The most important thing she said is "every child has a right to play".
      I think this must be heard by human rights institutions especially who concerns with children, especially developing countries who can not afford to build play grounds, besides there is not enough area to build. For example, in Palestine the houses are compacted, my suggestion is to use the playgrounds in schools, also as special playgrounds for children in the weekend. In this way we motivate them to go to school to learn, play, get rid of stress and clear their minds. The aim is to build a generation who is aware of their problems, educated, thinkful, healthy minded, and the most important able to take decisions based on the rules of problem solving.

      Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg understanding_swan | Government Girls H/S 41 WB Vehari | Pakistan
    06 Oct 2021

    How Japan stand step for climate changing control?

    Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg blessed_fact | Faujdarhat Cadet College | Bangladesh
    09 Oct 2021

    You mentioned "The rooftop has not much to offer for teens/elderly for sport"
    Actually "sport"doesn't offer. It depends on us on basically what we are willing to take from it. Some seek passion, some seek happiness, some seek dreams, some seek health whereas there are people who seek greed, fraud and many more not worth enough to mention.
    Let's make a motto for every growing country who reaches out it's hand for development and that is "For a healthy child's growth to be prosperous, they need a perfect environment to grow in".

    Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg understanding_swan | Government Girls H/S 41 WB Vehari | Pakistan
    12 Oct 2021

    In Dhrutis answer, she said "every child justifiable a ground a play". Such a precious answer but with due respect ma'am , that answer is really wool-gathering in our country's linear-perspective. Therefore I would like to ask, "what will be the easiest and the shortest way possible to ensure a sanitary vigorous and a antiseptic environment for a child of a developing/2nd world/3rd world country to play in?"

    Reply to this comment
    1. tom Tom @ Topical Talk
      understanding_swan's comment 12 Oct 2021

      This has been copied from another student above and therefore we gave contacted your teacher and removed you from the Student Hub.

      Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg caring_personality | Shouka Prep Girls School | Occupied Palestinian Territory
    12 Oct 2021

    In Drewaty answer she said about how to convince industrialized countries to give up their profits in exchange for saving the world from climate change so I want to ask how we can convince thim in practice.

    Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg independent_hurricane | Rajshahi Cadet College | Bangladesh
    14 Oct 2021

    "In Dhruti's answers she said...

    "There are lots of intergeneration pressure put on children of this generation."

    Therefore, I would like to ask...

    How can we release the pressure from our children and can't we use this as our weapon? can't we motivate them to environment friendly works through video games?

    Reply to this comment
  • Cheam Fields logo alert_writer | Cheam Fields Primary Academy A | United Kingdom
    15 Oct 2021

    In Dhruti's answers she said 'I don't think they need any more convincing'.
    Therefore, I would like to ask, Would they have been convinced when climate change was not so big of a problem?

    Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg champion_fact | Rafah Prep (B) Girls School | Occupied Palestinian Territory
    15 Oct 2021

    1. I listened to Dhruti
    2. The most important thing she said that every child deserves a ground a play
    3. I believe that her message should be heard by all parents principals of kindergarten in the world in order to take care of children because they will be the young of the society in the future

    Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg proactive_politics | Mymensingh Girls Cadet College | Bangladesh
    16 Oct 2021

    In Dhruti's answer she highlighted the fact that every child deserves a ground to play. Therefore I would like to ask that in the perspective of my country where the amount of population is huge and thus people use up all the space from that of playgrounds to make buildings, how can we the youth who are being deprived of that right to stay connected to our nature actually make the authorities understand the importance of playgrounds and the importance of the impacts the climate crisis can have on our future?

    Reply to this comment
    1. tom Tom @ Topical Talk
      proactive_politics's comment 18 Oct 2021

      Great question!

      Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg champion_fact | Rafah Prep (B) Girls School | Occupied Palestinian Territory
    17 Oct 2021

    oh my god sorry dear i puplished my answer here instead of publishing it under the comptition so i will copy it as it is under the competion , ok dear

    Reply to this comment
    1. tom Tom @ Topical Talk
      champion_fact's comment 18 Oct 2021

      That's fine, champion_fact!

      Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg poetic_coconut | Sylhet Cadet College | Bangladesh
    18 Oct 2021

    In Dhruti’s answers she said “What we need to dissect further is the values and norms that are guiding these policies and their actions because of prejudice of historical wave and of greed of overconsumption”.
    My research says that, according to a recent international study from the University of Leeds calculation, across 86 countries, the richest 10% of people consume around 20 times more energy than the poorest 10%. The largest source of greenhouse gas emissions from human activities in the United States is from burning fossil fuels for electricity, heat, and transportation. One out of every 10 energy dollars (roughly $170 billion in 2018) goes to fossil fuel supply projects in the U.S. alone, driving the rapid increase in U.S. oil and gas production in recent years. Coal, the most carbon-intensive of the fossil fuels, accounts for 70 percent of energy used in China today and is responsible for about three quarters of electricity generation. Russia’s economic growth is primarily driven by its fossil fuel reserves. With a post-Soviet Union record of 11.3 million barrels of oil produced per day in 2018, Russia is the world’s second largest oil producer, only behind the United States (Clemente, 2019). Countries where fuel accounts for more than 90% of total exports include Algeria, Azerbaijan, Brunei Darussalam, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya, Sudan and Venezuela. Thus fossil fuels are impacting the national economy of many developed and middle-eastern countries.
    My question to Dhuti is that how can she can play a prime impact on climate crisis through values and norms that are the policies and actions when these developing and middle- eastern countries depend on fossil fuels for their economical and infrastructural progress ? Will they make such a sacrifice crippling their economy by being influenced through values and norms only?

    Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg openminded_signature | Pabna Cadet College | Bangladesh
    18 Oct 2021

    I have a question in my mind that since almost all of the volunteer organization are trying to be commercial nowadays so how we can make them agree with the fact that only our nature is important regarding living in this world name and fame is not.

    Reply to this comment
  • Boutcher-logo-250x250.jpg storytelling_king | Boutcher C of E Primary School A | United Kingdom
    18 Oct 2021

    I have listened to Dhruti Chakravarthi and I find her message very powerful. However, I have a few questions for her.

    In Dhruti's answers she mentions that the governments across the world doesn't need any more convincing to help stop climate change. Although, it seems that some of the countries aren't taking this situation as seriously as it needs to be taken.

    So my question is, how are we sure that the parties in control are doing the right thing?

    My second question is something she mentions in one of the questions about how she would like young people to be involved in the governing process.
    As much as I can agree, I would like to ask, why do young people need to be involved so vitally in our future of the environment?

    Thank you,

    Reply to this comment
    1. tom Tom @ Topical Talk
      storytelling_king's comment 18 Oct 2021

      These are really interesting questions, storytelling_king. Thank you for sharing them.

      Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg smart_theory | Start-Rite Schools | Nigeria
    18 Oct 2021

    I have listened to Dhruti Chakravarthi and her general message is very heart moving but I have one question.
    In Dhruti's answers, she said "every child deserves a ground to play". Therefore I would like to ask, In countries like mine that don't have an overflow of finances/funds. How do countries like these provide "grounds to play", are there any less expensive ways?

    Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg sympathetic_road | Mymensingh Girls Cadet College | Bangladesh
    19 Oct 2021

    I have listened to Dhruti Chakravarthy and she talked about the the possibility regarding the contribution of Indian women can make in context of climate change . Now I would like to ask her "Can you please specify a number of steps that women of the Indian sub continent can take in case of addressing the effects of climate change, initiating strategy for reducing this adverse effects and increasing awareness among all especially the rural women and children? ''

    Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg lively_history | Faujdarhat Cadet College | Bangladesh
    19 Oct 2021

    I heard Dhuruti Chakravarti and two things I have in my mind are that every child deserves a playground and the world does not need any more convincing to reduce the problems of climate change. But does the word really net need any more convincing and do the countries really understand the problems created by climate change. And in my country playgrounds are being used to make buildings for the excess population and for that we are not being able to enjoy the facilities that we should be able to relish. So in this case what shoould we do???

    Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg free_river | Faujdarhat Cadet College | Bangladesh
    19 Oct 2021

    In Dhruti's answer she highlighted the truth that every child have the right to have a ground to play.
    Therefore, I would like to ask her what the childrens of the under developed countries will do rather they should make places for their childrens so that they can become connected with the nature at the time whan they have not enough money or they should teach their students about nature in classrooms or virtually and make them concern??

    Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg champion_mode | Sylhet Cadet College | Bangladesh
    20 Oct 2021

    In Dhruti's answer she highlighted the fact that every child deserves a ground to play. Therefore I would like to ask that in the perspective of my country where the amount of population is huge and thus people use up all the space from that of playgrounds to make buildings, how can we the youth who are being deprived of that right to stay connected to our nature actually make the authorities understand the importance of playgrounds and the importance of the impacts the climate crisis can have on our future?

    Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg openhearted_opportunity | Prep A Girls School | Occupied Palestinian Territory
    20 Oct 2021

    I have listened to the great woman Dhruti Chakravarthi The most important thing she said is that every child deserves a theatrical land. Yes, I think that the whole world should listen to its message, especially the principals and teachers of kindergartens, to take care of them because they are the youth of the future and our hope is based on them. Yes, and I also mentioned that governments around the world don't need more persuasion to help stop climate change and some countries also don't take this position seriously. So the question I had in mind was how do we make sure that all the controlling parties are doing the right thing?

    Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg shrewd_flight | Sylhet Cadet College | Bangladesh
    20 Oct 2021

    In Dhruti's answers she said the best way for girls from different places of the world to step up is to make all kinds of climate change activities, movements etc. very inclusive. That means to protest alongside people of various cultural and social identities.

    Therefore, I would like to ask her, "When so many diverse people are unified, there may be some people who are racist and don't like to mix with people of other races and casts. So, how can we motivate those people and turn their mentality to the good side to unify everyone?"

    Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg openhearted_explanation | Government girls elementary school sarki mankera bhakkar | Pakistan
    20 Oct 2021

    I read dhurti i think that the answer she gave or opinion are according to the develpoed countries as in third world or in 2nd workd their is need child a protective healthy and safe enviornment in which they play without any fear .

    Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg openhearted_explanation | Government girls elementary school sarki mankera bhakkar | Pakistan
    20 Oct 2021

    When girls make a setup of their own bussines and some other wys to protect the climate.they also need social support,

    Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg openhearted_explanation | Government girls elementary school sarki mankera bhakkar | Pakistan
    20 Oct 2021

    When girls make a setup of their own bussines and some other wys to protect the climate.they also need social support,

    Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg openhearted_explanation | Government girls elementary school sarki mankera bhakkar | Pakistan
    20 Oct 2021

    Dhurti says every child has a right to play in ground but i think that yes she is right but everyone has not all facilities and in out side is fear of many things for it need ps funds which can help and also palya impotant role in climate changes

    Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg lovely_kiwifruit | Jabalia Prep Girls A School | Occupied Palestinian Territory
    20 Oct 2021

    I listened to Dhruti chakravarthi.
    The most important thing she said was building a connection between children and nature .
    I think parents and teachers should hear her message as they are the one to shape the mind of a chi

    Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg affable_opinion | Pabna Cadet College | Bangladesh
    21 Oct 2021

    I paid attention to Dhruti, In Dhruti's answer she featured the way that each youngster merits a ground to play. Consequently I might want to request that in the viewpoint from my nation where the measure of populace is enormous and hence individuals go through all the space from that of jungle gyms to make structures, how could we the young who are being denied of that option to remain associated with our inclination really cause the specialists to comprehend the significance of jungle gyms and the significance of the effects the environment emergency can have on our future?

    In another words my inquiry is, how are we certain that the gatherings in control are getting along the proper thing?

    My subsequent inquiry is something she makes reference to in one of the inquiries concerning how she might want youngsters to be associated with the overseeing system.

    However much I can concur, I might want to ask, for what reason do youngsters should be involved so essentially in our eventual fate of the climate?

    In the end I accept that her message ought to be heard by all guardians chiefs of kindergarten on the planet to deal with youngsters since they will be the youthful of the general public later on.

    That's it in a nutshell.

    Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg free_river | Faujdarhat Cadet College | Bangladesh
    21 Oct 2021

    In Dhruti's answers The most important thing she said about was confidently revealing the harsh truth of our society to everyone.
    Therefore, I would like to ask when there is not enough opportunity to speak then how can one stand against those society alone??

    Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg frank_jackfruit | Rimal Prep Girls School C | Occupied Palestinian Territory
    22 Oct 2021

    . I listened to Dhruti
    2. The most important thing she said that every child deserves a ground a play
    3. I believe that her message should be heard by all parents principals of kindergarten in the world in order to take care of children because they will be the youn

    Reply to this comment

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