Meet Hernán, founding member of the Ceibo Alliance

hernan.jpg

We're delighted to bring you our interview with Hernán Payaguaje about the impact of climate change on indigenous communities in Ecuadaor. Thank you also to Alex Goff for translating during our interview.

Hernán comes from the indigenous Siekopai community of San Pablo, Ecuador, located, where his people have lived for generations.

Hernán made the most of the unique opportunity to study at university, where he began to believe that for his people to survive in a rapidly changing landscape, they would need to learn to use modern technology, as well as legal and political systems, to their benefit, while maintaining a strong cultural identity. Hernán was a founding member of the indigenous organization Ceibo Alliance - which represents the indigenous people of four nationalities of the Ecuadorian Amazon - A'i Kofan, Siekopai, Siona, and Waorani - who decided to come together in an alliance to fight for the defence of their culture, territory and life.

In this interview, Hernán talks about how the voices of indigenous peoples have traditionally been silenced and hidden and he explains what he and others are doing to preserve their cultures, heritages and homes in the face of a rapidly changing world.

Watch Hernán's answers and at the bottom of the page, share the most important thing you've learned.

If you wish to go straight to Alex's translation of Hernán's answer, it begins around half way through each video.


What was the key to success of uniting four groups in the Ceibo alliance? Did anyone oppose this and if so, how did you overcome opposition?
curious_owl | Joypurhat Girls' Cadet College | Bangladesh


How does the world respond to your alliance's involvement in decision-making at international level?
enchanted_turkey | School of Excellence Sector-23 Rohini | India

Historically, our struggles and our perspectives as indigenous peoples have been hidden and have been excluded from international debates and decision-making, and that's been intentional. Our voices have been silenced by governments and companies in the industries that feel threatened by the messages that we bring.

Hernán Payaguaje on how the world have reacted to indigenous peoples in the past


Do you think COP26 will be inclusive enough?
Tom @ Topical Talk

From my perspective there has never been a robust participation of indigenous peoples in these spaces... I do not believe enough has been done is and is continuing to be done to include indigenous voices"

Hernán Payaguaje on COP26


What are your expectations for the Ceibo Alliance in the future?
victorious_contribution | Rangpur Cadet College | Bangladesh


In a rapidly changing landscape, how important is technology for you and your people in the Ceibo Alliance?
cultured_lute | Beit Hanoun Prep Girls A School | Occupied Palestinian Territory


What are the impacts of climate change on your cultural identity and your legal and political systems?
lively_deer | Rajshahi Cadet College | Bangladesh

Our agricultural systems...are based on the skies and on the seasons but the stability and consistency of those seasons have been changing in recent years because of climate change

Hernán Payaguaje on the impact of climate change on his peoples


Thank you so much to Hernán for his insightful and fascinating answers.

Thank you also to Alex Goff for translating during the interview.

What's the most important thing you learned from Hernán's answers? Add your thoughts to the comments below.

For example:

"After watching Hernán's answers, I learned that...

This is important because...

I would like to find out more about..."


CHANCE TO CONNECT - look for what other people want to find out more about and do a bit of research to help them get going! Share a website, article or news story that you think will help them find answers to their questions.

Comments (66)

  • British Council.jpg appreciative_pear | Shouka Prep Girls School | Occupied Palestinian Territory
    05 Oct 2021

    Reports indicate that millions of people around the world will be forced to relocate due to rising seas, floods, droughts and storms. While this would affect humans worldwide, the impact would be disproportionately disproportionate to indigenous peoples in regions such as the Arctic and the Pacific. In fact, failure to take action by local actors can lead not only to the destruction of their lands but also to genocide for them as a whole. Indigenous peoples relate to their climate. One of the indigenous groups in Hawaii, the Maoli, for example, believe that they are physically related to all the natural things found on the island of the archipelago. On the other hand, Westerners tend not to identify the land in which they inhabit, but to define themselves on the basis of their occupation. Ultimately, indigenous peoples are the most affected by climate change, and the 2009 World Indigenous Summit Report on Climate Change shows the negative impacts they face in 7 regions around the world

    Reply to this comment
    1. tom Tom @ Topical Talk
      appreciative_pear's comment 07 Oct 2021

      Can you tell us where you found your information, appreciative_pear?

      Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg appreciative_pear | Shouka Prep Girls School | Occupied Palestinian Territory
    05 Oct 2021

    Indigenous peoples must be part of the solution to the problem of climate change. The important value of traditional knowledge should not be underestimated. Indigenous peoples are instrumental in finding solutions for today and tomorrow. The world's climate is witnessing levels noticeable turmoil and has attracted large-scale bushfires which have caused losses In the Arctic, there are horrific images of bears starving in their natural habitats due to rising water and melting ice caps. In Kenya, changing patterns of ocean circulation have created the conditions for locusts to destroy grasslands. These extreme events indicate that The stark reality is that our climate is changing because of our actions, with dire consequences for humanity, the ecosystem and global biodiversity.

    Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg insightful_starfish | Shouka Prep Girls School | Occupied Palestinian Territory
    06 Oct 2021

    After watching Hernán's answers, I learned that Indigenous peoples have a deep spiritual connection to their lands and resources. However, indigenous peoples are increasingly being forced to migrate, while some are subject to displacement or relocation without their consent, others are fleeing the violence, conflict or degradation caused by climate change,And their voices are not heard within the decisions of the Cop26 summit, even though they are the most affected by the climate.
    So we all have to support them so that their voices can be heard and they can participate effectively in the decisions of the Cop26.

    This is important because it is an opportunity to consider the challenges facing these peoples and the available ways to move forward in reviving their identities and encouraging them to protect their rights outside their traditional territories and to protect their original homeland.

    I would like to find out more about How did they face those challenges and what difficult decisions could they take so that their voices could be heard for the whole world.

    Reply to this comment
    1. tom Tom @ Topical Talk
      insightful_starfish's comment 07 Oct 2021

      Well done for listening to Hernan's answers and giving your response!

      Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg appreciative_pear | Shouka Prep Girls School | Occupied Palestinian Territory
    06 Oct 2021

    Indigenous peoples depend on local biodiversity and ecosystem services for their survival and well-being. This means that these communities are more vulnerable than others to the effects of climate change. For example, indigenous peoples in the Arctic are among the first groups affected by the exacerbation of food insecurity caused by the melting of permafrost. The ILO points to six “unique risks” that unite indigenous peoples' experiences of climate change. Indigenous peoples are poor; It depends on renewable natural resources; These natural resources are affected by climate change; These indigenous peoples are experiencing high rates of migration due to climate change; It is characterized by gender inequality; They are often excluded from decision-making processes in matters relating to their rights. These factors reduce their capacity to redress, increasing their vulnerability and undermining their ability to mitigate or adapt to climate change. These factors also threaten their ability to uphold and guarantee their rights

    Reply to this comment
    1. tom Tom @ Topical Talk
      appreciative_pear's comment 07 Oct 2021

      Can you tell us where you found this information, appreciative_pear?

      Reply to this comment
      1. British Council.jpg appreciative_pear | Shouka Prep Girls School | Occupied Palestinian Territory
        Tom @ Topical Talk's comment 07 Oct 2021

        I found the information in the school library where I read it and sent it to you

        Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg optimistic_market | Jabalia Prep Girls A School | Occupied Palestinian Territory
    06 Oct 2021

    Information and communication technologies are advancing at an astonishing pace, but access to the Internet, especially via the World Wide Web, is perhaps the most important element to unlocking the potential of new technologies. The Sustainable Development Goals have rightly recognized the vital role that information and communication technologies can play in their realization. Target C of Sustainable Development Goal 9, in particular, calls for universal access to ICTs, particularly in least developed countries, by 2020—months from now. Half of the world's population is expected to be online in 2019 (tentatively estimated for 2017). Of the approximately 3.9 billion people still offline, an overwhelming majority live in the global south and 2 billion of them are women. Nine out of ten young people who are offline live in Africa or the Asia Pacific region. By the way, about climate change, I wrote about it earlier, but I want to increase my information and share it with you. This review focused on evaluating the potential effects of climate change on plant pests and thus on plant health. A plant pest, hereinafter referred to as a “pest”, is any species, strain or biotype of plants, animals or pathogens that are harmful to plants or plant products, as defined in the approved ISPM (ISPM 5). by the Commission on Phytosanitary Measures of the International Plant Protection Convention.

    Climate change is defined as the increase in average surface air and sea surface temperatures combined, worldwide over a period of 30 years. Global warming is expressed relative to the period 1850-1900, which is used as a rough estimate of pre-industrial temperatures. Global warming from pre-industrial levels compared to the decade 2006-2015 has been estimated to be 0.87°C. 2 000 . ago

    Reply to this comment
    1. tom Tom @ Topical Talk
      optimistic_market's comment 07 Oct 2021

      Can you tell us where you found your information, optimistic_market?

      Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg free_river | Faujdarhat Cadet College | Bangladesh
    08 Oct 2021

    After watching hernan's answers what i learned that this climate crisis is now become a crisis of culture and politics and got to know that they have been force to move from their places and sometimes they have to loose the culture of their ancestors .sometimes the climate crisis is becoming the cause of political unrest and many people are loosing their lives . often we talk about under developed or developing countries but actually they are the real sufferer.
    it is very much important because we have to listen to them and have to stand with them and gather the support of the world.if their voice is heard then the rest ethnic groups will come forward and speak for their rights.also they can learn how to cope with the situation .

    i would like to fond that how we can motivate people to come to stand with them and we can do for the people who lost their things and motivate them to start freshly

    Reply to this comment
    1. Olivia-Avatar.jpg Olivia @ Topical Talk
      free_river's comment 11 Oct 2021

      Excellent listening shown - well done!

      Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg clever_lime | Shouka Prep Girls School | Occupied Palestinian Territory
    09 Oct 2021

    Various international agreements provide for consultation with indigenous peoples on the use of their knowledge and practices when it comes to issues affecting them. The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples sets out a minimum level of rights to ensure respect, recognition and equity in consultation with indigenous peoples. The Paris Agreement on Climate Change provides that measures to address climate change respect, promote and respect the obligations of indigenous peoples and local communities. The Local Communities and Indigenous Peoples Platform, established by the Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, recognizes the need to include solutions drawn from indigenous peoples in climate change conversations. However, ensuring that these ideas are incorporated into public policy-making requires more work. The Convention on Biological Diversity and the Nagoya Protocol recognize the importance of obtaining the prior informed consent of indigenous peoples and defining mutually agreed terms for the sharing of benefits arising from the use of indigenous traditional knowledge. Negotiations under the Intergovernmental Committee on Intellectual Property and Genetic Resources, Traditional Knowledge and Folklore at WIPO have the potential to enhance the rights of indigenous peoples to protect or defend their interests when their knowledge is sought or used to develop climate-related technological products and processes.

    Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg clever_lime | Shouka Prep Girls School | Occupied Palestinian Territory
    09 Oct 2021

    Increasing recognition of the scale of the climate crisis is driving the search for green solutions. The concept of “greening” in its general sense refers to a global change in behavior in order to raise environmental awareness in human activities and in the design and implementation of development policies and frameworks. The aforementioned international agreements recognize the important contribution that indigenous peoples and their principles of environmental management can make to the sustainable management and use of biodiversity. Indigenous lands cover 22 percent of the world's land and nearly 80 percent of the planet's biodiversity. It borders 85 percent of the world's protected areas. Therefore, thanks to traditional approaches to managing natural resources, these lands are a sink for hundreds of billions of tons of carbon

    Reply to this comment
    1. Olivia-Avatar.jpg Olivia @ Topical Talk
      clever_lime's comment 11 Oct 2021

      Please make sure all comments are written in your own words and not copied.

      Reply to this comment
    2. Olivia-Avatar.jpg Olivia @ Topical Talk
      clever_lime's comment 11 Oct 2021

      Please make sure all comments are written in your own words and not copied.

      Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg clever_lime | Shouka Prep Girls School | Occupied Palestinian Territory
    09 Oct 2021

    The world's climate is experiencing unprecedented turmoil. The large-scale bushfires in Australia that have caused huge losses in life (animal and human), property and the environment have attracted global media attention for months. In the Arctic, there are horrific images of bears starving in their natural habitats due to rising waters and melting ice caps; In Kenya, changing patterns of ocean circulation have created the conditions for locusts to destroy grasslands. These extreme events point to the stark reality that our climate is changing because of our actions, with dire consequences for humanity, ecosystems and global biodiversitNs

    Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg methodical_ant | Faujdarhat Cadet College | Bangladesh
    11 Oct 2021

    Indigenous people generally don't contribute much to climate change but are the receivers of it's effect in the first hand. Do you think indigenous people should be given monetary compensation for this?

    Reply to this comment
    1. tom Tom @ Topical Talk
      methodical_ant's comment 11 Oct 2021

      Excellent question!

      Reply to this comment
    2. British Council.jpg trustworthy_orangutan | Mymensingh Girls Cadet College | Bangladesh
      methodical_ant's comment 17 Oct 2021

      hello! I found this information in a research paper,even if you don"t find the exact answer of your question,I hope it helps you in your research as well!
      "Compensating Indigenous social and cultural losses: a community-based multiple-attribute approach"
      "Compensation principles

      Compensation for losses should reflect legal precedent informed by principles held as just by society. In the case of Indigenous peoples, compensation must also reflect the worldviews and governance system held by the community or nation, which includes the recognition that “an over-emphasis on the imperatives of commerce may ultimately provide an unfair basis for determining a compensation amount” (Litchfield 1999:256). Principles include that compensation awarded to Indigenous peoples for the loss of traditional lands or restrictions on traditional practices should,

      Reflect a defensible logic and be nonarbitrary, so that arguments are transparent, repeatable, and meaningful;
      Recognize the many limitations associated with monetization of individual and community losses experienced by a First Nation (P. Burke 2002, unpublished manuscript);
      Include both economic and noneconomic losses, keeping in mind that Indigenous societies often maintain a relationship with their territories and share important cultural values and practices distinct from those of mainstream society (Berkes 1999). Specifically, consider the inclusion of compensation for mental distress and other psychological impacts associated with the loss, diminishment, or disruption of ancestral lands, traditional practices, and rights without consent;
      Account for temporal considerations by translating losses experienced in the past or future into commensurate terms so they can be evaluated alongside current losses;
      Include the understanding that payments for losses are not solatium: that is, they relate not to damage for hurt feelings but to far more consequential damages;
      Ensure that accurate facts are determined from experts and relevant documents but also ensure that written and oral information sources acknowledge the experience and perceptions of community members (Kotaska 2013);
      Consider and carry forward 100% of losses incurred, quantified in the terms of the year they were incurred and adjusted for inflation (Specific Claims Tribunal Canada 2016); and
      Reflect a current, up-to-date understanding of the responsibilities of government to compensate Indigenous communities for past and ongoing losses, notwithstanding historical precedents and previous judgments that may not reflect current evaluation methods or current social standards of fairness and justice.
      Compensation precedents

      Understanding the logic of previous compensation awarded for economic, social, health, and cultural losses is helpful: it can contribute to the creation of a defensible logic for compensation payments, it suggests underlying principles of fairness, and it encourages the adoption of consistent methodologies. In addition, knowledge of comparable cases can serve to highlight potential prejudice or bias in awards because it highlights the type and range of damages, helping to ensure that any specific compensation payment is reflective of the overall severity of the impacts suffered and the number of people experiencing the loss.

      With this context in mind, we briefly summarize several recent compensation awards for damages experienced by Indigenous and non-Indigenous people.

      Compensation was awarded by the Federal Court of Australia (2016) for the removal of land rights from Indigenous title holders and “loss of traditional access and use of the land.” The Court awarded the Ngaliwurru People and the Nungali People A$512,400 for economic loss (plus A$1,488,261 in interest) and A$1.3 million for cultural loss, referred to as pecuniary in nature, i.e., a real and genuine loss, rather than a solatium payment. Two main reasons for the compensation award were stated: (a) construction undertaken by the local government affected the community’s “capacity to conduct ceremonial and spiritual activities,” which “caused clearly identified distress and concern,” and (b) the government’s actions led to a “failed responsibility for the obligation, under the traditional laws and customs, to have cared for and looked after that land” (High Court of Australia 2019). The High Court of Australia subsequently reduced the award for economic loss, but upheld the award of A$1.3 million for cultural loss, with the final award totaling A$2.5 million (High Court of Australia 2019).
      Fatal accident schedules, established in several Canadian provinces, set criteria for determining the level of payments to be made by government to survivors even though the Courts clearly recognize that no amount of money can truly compensate a survivor for the loss of a loved one. In Saskatchewan, for example, payments of Can$60,000 to the spouse of the deceased person and Can$30,000 to a parent or child are now mandated. We note that, in the course of our community interviews, several members made the analogy that the loss of a portion of a First Nation’s ancestral lands is akin to the loss of a loved one.
      In September 2019, the Canadian government was ordered to pay approximately Can$40,000 to each Indigenous child placed in the off-reserve welfare system, with some payments also being made to their parents and grandparents. The total amount of compensation payments is estimated to exceed Can$1 billion.
      In May, 2018 the Canadian Federal Court approved an Can$875 million settlement as part of compensation for what has come to be known as the “Sixties Scoop,” when Indigenous children were involuntarily removed from their families and homes.
      In the United States, compensation was awarded to victims of abuse from Catholic priests (see Elie 2019). In one case involving four boys who were sexually abused by a religious educator at their church in New York City, the Diocese of Brooklyn agreed (in 2018) to a settlement of US$27.5 million.
      In 2005, Canada awarded compensation (approved by Cabinet 10 May 2006) to Indigenous children forced to attend residential schools for the damages suffered while in attendance; however, the amounts specifically excluded the collective and intergenerational harms that arose from the conduct of residential schools. Payments were based on a set amount of Can$10,000 for the first year in attendance or any part thereof, and Can$3000 for each additional (or part) year."
      source: https://www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol25/iss4/art4/

      Reply to this comment
      1. tom Tom @ Topical Talk
        trustworthy_orangutan's comment 18 Oct 2021

        Please try to keep quotations from papers brief, so that we can see what you'd like us to focus on. Make sure your comments are made up of your own words and only "quoting" other sources in speech marks.

        Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg adaptable_memory | Faujdarhat Cadet College | Bangladesh
    12 Oct 2021

    After watching hernan's answers, I learned that climate crisis doesn't only affect a certain piece of land or territory and their people for the time being, but also leave some drastically negative impacts sometimes on their lives and cultures permanently.

    In our country Bangladesh, river erosion peaks mainly during June-to-October storm season. This year, it has crushed the homes of at slightest 8,000 individuals in Bangladesh’s northern locale amid overwhelming July surges that cleared through the locale and uprooted at slightest 300,000 individuals over the nation. Hundreds more family units have been stranded in the subsequent days.

    These homeless people are shifting to other places in search of food and shelter, and living a very cruel life. And as lifestyle has a great impact on culture, sometime many of the cultuires of these people are being extinct every year.

    So, we must come forward to overcome climate crisis so that we can save both their lives and also their cultures

    Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg wonderful_banjo | Mymensingh Girls Cadet College | Bangladesh
    12 Oct 2021

    After watching hernan's answers I came to learn about his dear respect towards his community and motherland.Not only he is concerned about protecting it but also he would not agree to compromise their rights in any cost.Reports show that many indigenous people are being forced to relocate as their traditional lands become uninhabitable due to climate change. ... In Kenya, where desertification is changing grazing routes, nomadic indigenous groups such as the Maasai and Oromo, are being forced to move to the cities,the same has been done to hernan's people.But they do the opposite to get these results as Indigenous peoples are the best guardians of global biodiversity. More than 20 per cent of the carbon stored in forests is found in land managed by indigenous peoples, preserving vital carbon pools which continuously capture CO2 and release oxygen into the atmosphere, thereby reducing climate change impacts. While Indigenous Peoples own, occupy, or use a quarter of the world's surface area, they safeguard 80% of the world's remaining biodiversity.As harnen has already said "Our voices have been silenced by governments and companies in the industries that feel threatened by the messages that we bring."But the indigenous peoples' observations contribute importantly to advancing climate science, by ensuring that assessments of climate change impacts and policies for climate change adaptation are meaningful and applicable at the local level.That's why we should respect the knowledge of indigenous people regarding the climate change to get advanced solutions in the near future.

    Reply to this comment
    1. tom Tom @ Topical Talk
      wonderful_banjo's comment 12 Oct 2021

      You've listened to Hernan's answers carefully and come to your own conclusions. Well done!

      Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg lucky_ant | Faujdarhat Cadet College | Bangladesh
    14 Oct 2021

    After watching hernan's answers what i learned that is what are the problems minority groups are facing and how our small helps can do a lot to them this is important because we take pride of their culture and we have to protect it . and they can also come forward and share their opinion so i would like to know more about how you will motivate or tell the young peoples who want to work for ethnic groups and save their culture?

    Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg miraculous_beetle | Faujdarhat Cadet College | Bangladesh
    14 Oct 2021

    Indeed the initiative taken by Hernan has been a life-changer for his own people and it can change the life of other indigenous people worldwide. Indigenous peoples are among the first to face the direct consequences of climate change, due to their dependence upon, and close relationship, with the environment and its resources. Climate change exacerbates the difficulties already faced by indigenous communities including political and economic marginalization, loss of land and resources, human rights violations, discrimination and unemployment.Climate change poses threats and dangers to the survival of indigenous communities worldwide, even though indigenous peoples contribute the least to greenhouse emissions. In fact, indigenous peoples are vital to, and active in, the many ecosystems that inhabit their lands and territories and may therefore help enhance the resilience of these ecosystems. In Bangladesh, villagers are creating floating vegetable gardens to protect their livelihoods from flooding, while in Vietnam, communities are helping to plant dense mangroves along the coast to diffuse tropical storm waves. Enhancing and supporting the adaptive capacity of indigenous peoples will only be successful if it is integrated with other strategies such as disaster preparation, land-use planning, environmental conservation and national plans for sustainable development. In many instances, adaptation to new conditions requires additional financial resources and the transfer of technological capacity that most indigenous communities do not possess. So I think that COP26 should take initiatives to pass out compulsory fundings to the indigenous people so that they can carry out their abilities more effectively.

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    1. tom Tom @ Topical Talk
      miraculous_beetle's comment 14 Oct 2021

      How likely do you think this is, miraculous_beetle?

      Reply to this comment
      1. British Council.jpg miraculous_beetle | Faujdarhat Cadet College | Bangladesh
        Tom @ Topical Talk's comment 16 Oct 2021

        It's been seen forever that most governments have been ignorant about how the minority or indigenous people are living in their countries. So it can be tough to expect extra fundings from the government. But if the higher-ups specifically the United Nations send out special instructions about the point and keep on pressurizing the government then I think that the indigenous people will be benefited from this very soon.

        Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg adaptable_memory | Faujdarhat Cadet College | Bangladesh
    14 Oct 2021

    Indigenous people are the worst sufferers of the impact of climate change in the world including Bangladesh.

    IUCN Country Representative Raquibul Amin, during a presentation said, "Climate, biodiversity, ecosystem and everything changed a lot over the years. We have seen its negative effect mostly in areas lived by the indigenous and the poor community." Referring to a website of Global Environment Facility, Soil Resource Development Institute Principal Scientific Officer Ameer Md Zahid said, "Almost 3.2 billion people are affected by land degradation worldwide, and it's 72 million in Bangladesh. One of the reasons for degradation is land erosion and landslide, and it happens mostly in hilly areas, particularly in CHT."

    The impact of climate change on indigenous communities is multifold such as livelihood problems emanating from drying up of streams and wells, groundwater depletion, depletion of wildlife, infertility of crops, the mortality of seedlings; disaster vulnerability resulting from irregular and heavy rainfall, storm surge, soil erosion, landslides; climate-induced diseases such as respiratory dysfunction, arsenic, skin diseases and social competition regarding scarce natural livelihood resources. In addition, land acquisition in name of development and tourism imperils the situation because the concept of eco-tourism has not developed yet in this country. There is also diversification among indigenous communities in Bangladesh in terms of origin, culture, ethnicity, farming practice, and residual area. Some of the communities live in hilly tracts of Sylhet, Chittagong where others live in plain land of Rajshahi, Mymansing areas. Thus, the impact patterns are also different. For example, a study by Akter et. al. (2013) found that the agricultural production of the Garo, Khasia, Tripura, and Manipuri communities were affected by climate change while communities in the Chittagong Hill Tracts area face scarcity of drinking water, landslides, etc (Mamtaz, 2018). On the other hand, the unplanned tourism industry and development projects lead to the acquisition of lands which deteriorates the situation. Though the construction of roads and buildings seems economic growth literally it costs natural, cultural, and social originality as these projects merely aimed at a monetary profit rather than broader sustainability.

    Despite all, indigenous people are actually unheard and avoided by government authorities. so the most suiting solution is nothing but HEARING OUT OWN VOICES! That's exactly what sir Hernán did. And the alliance he formed was unprecedented and mind-blowing. He literally has set a great example for all the indigenous ethnic communities through out the whole wide world. Generally indigenous communities create riots between clan to clan or community to community regarding power and supremacy. But despite all of that, and creating an effective alliance is beyond expectation. He tactfully understood the significance of protection of their own culture and came forth to protect their culture together.
    At last, I suggest we should also step forward and protest for them and make their voices heard. Governments should take steps taking the PERSPECTIVES OF THE RESPECTIVE INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES AND MAKE EFFECTIVE STEPS TO HELP INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES TO TACLE C;LIMATE CHANGE.

    Reply to this comment
    1. tom Tom @ Topical Talk
      adaptable_memory's comment 14 Oct 2021

      A very strong response, adaptable_memory! You've also brought in evidence from the areas surrounding you and cited your sources too, which shows excellent research skills.

      Reply to this comment
      1. British Council.jpg adaptable_memory | Faujdarhat Cadet College | Bangladesh
        Tom @ Topical Talk's comment 14 Oct 2021

        Really means a lot sir. Giving down my heartiest thanks for your kind compliments

        Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg free_river | Faujdarhat Cadet College | Bangladesh
    14 Oct 2021

    After watching Hernan's answer I came to know that how much they love their country and their culture and how for climate change they have to leave their culture and how much desperate are they for their culture and this is important because many a people still don't know about the cultural crisis made of climate change .after knowing this people can come forward to save their lives and help them . Hernan had worked for them and experienced of it so I would like to find out more about how normal people can work to save them or measures we can take as a ordinary people so that they might get at least little bit help from us??

    Reply to this comment
    1. Olivia-Avatar.jpg Olivia @ Topical Talk
      free_river's comment 14 Oct 2021

      Excellent listening shown, well done!

      Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg broadminded_independence | Faujdarhat Cadet College | Bangladesh
    14 Oct 2021

    After listening to Hernán's answers, I learned that indigenous peoples are the main actors in the protection of the vast majority of sensitive ecosystems. But their perspectives and thoughts are rarely taken into account in government decisions that affect the entire world. Sometimes we can see that very few indigenous people are invited to participate in the debate on the climate crisis. But the diversity of voices in the indigenous sector is not enough. Indigenous peoples are working to save a vast amount of natural resources, but their voices are not heard, especially the front liners.
    I believe that their voices must be heard and this is important because the climate crisis is an issue of indigenous peoples' rights that affects them first, their opinions and needs are often not taken into account in conversations and decisions about the climate in all aspects. Their perspective must be heard as they are already experiencing discrimination and inequality, which have the worst consequences, greatly exacerbate the prevailing challenges they face, and create new barriers that prevent their rights from being respected.
    I would like to find out more what necessary measures can be taken so that the viewpoints as indigenous peoples which have been suppressed and neglected from international debates and decision-making, do not remain unheard and their opinions are duly taken into account.

    Reply to this comment
    1. tom Tom @ Topical Talk
      broadminded_independence's comment 14 Oct 2021

      That sounds an interesting thing to find out - could you do some research, perhaps even through Hernan's own Ceibo Alliance?

      Reply to this comment
      1. British Council.jpg broadminded_independence | Faujdarhat Cadet College | Bangladesh
        Tom @ Topical Talk's comment 14 Oct 2021

        From the responses above we came to know that Hernán is from the Siekopai community of San Pablo, which is located on the banks of the Aguarico River. Having had most of the unique opportunities to study at a university, he began to believe that in order to survive in a rapidly changing landscape, his people had to learn to use modern technology and legal and political systems to their advantage while maintaining a strong cultural identity to keep them rooted in the forest where they have always lived.
        Indigenous organization Ceibo Alliance is also running under Hernan’s leadership which is working in the defense of indigenous territory, cultural survival, and the building of viable solutions-based alternatives to rainforest destruction and other climate crisis. More than 1,164 rainwater filtration systems have been installed under the Ceibo Alliance for each family of the Kofán, Siekopai, Siona and Waorani nationalities affected by hydrocarbon contamination. In addition, they protect 32,000 hectares of tropical forest in the ancestral area of Kofan, which is a strong example of saving the climate and solving climate crisis. Again, 180,000 hectares of mega-biodiverse forest in the Waorani area of Pastaza are protected by the Ceibo Alliance. But the unfortunate thing is that, after so much effort behind this land and saving the climate, they are the victims of climate change in the first place. It is sadder that their views and perspectives do not receive due consideration at climate summits and international weather debates.
        I firmly believe that if their views are duly taken into account in international and other climate debates, our mother earth will be a much better place to live. The government must take necessary steps to create a platform for them to speak to the world about their problems and solutions to the climate crisis from their point of view.

        Reply to this comment
  • British Council.jpg appreciative_pear | Shouka Prep Girls School | Occupied Palestinian Territory
    14 Oct 2021

    Indigenous peoples are considered the basis of their survival. They are one of the most important means of their daily livelihood. Because they are one of the groups most affected by climate change, indigenous peoples and governments must give them the right to participate effectively in these negotiations on climate change. Do you think that indigenous peoples have a role in combating addressing climate change? Climate Yes where indigenous peoples must be part of the solution The problem of climate change such as indigenous peoples owning a wealth of environmental knowledge can be of passive importance in effectively adapting to climate change and consulting among them and we can slow and stop climate change because we have the knowledge, the power and the ability to do so

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  • British Council.jpg frank_jackfruit | Rimal Prep Girls School C | Occupied Palestinian Territory
    15 Oct 2021

    After watching Hernán's answers, I learned that Indigenous peoples have a deep spiritual connection to their lands and resources. However, indigenous peoples are increasingly being forced to migrate, while some are subject to displacement or relocation without their consent, others are fleeing the violence, conflict or degradation caused by climate change,And their voices are not heard within the decisions of the Cop26 summit, even though they are the most affected by the climate.
    So we all have to support them so that their voices can be heard and they can participate effectively in the decisions of the Cop26.

    This is important because it is an opportunity to consider the challenges facing these peoples and the available ways to move forward in reviving their identities and encouraging them to protect their rights outside their traditional territories and to protect their original homeland.

    I would like to find out more about How did they face those challenges and what difficult decisions could they take so that their voices could be heard for the whole world.

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  • British Council.jpg broadminded_independence | Faujdarhat Cadet College | Bangladesh
    15 Oct 2021

    After listening to Hernán's answers, I learned that indigenous peoples are the main actors in the protection of the vast majority of sensitive ecosystems. But their perspectives and thoughts are rarely taken into account in government decisions that affect the entire world. From the responses I came to know that, indigenous organization Ceibo Alliance which is running under Hernan’s leadership is working in the defense of indigenous territory and building of viable solutions-based alternatives to rainforest destruction and other climate crisis. More than 1,164 rainwater filtration systems have been installed and 180,000 hectares of mega-biodiverse forest in the Waorani area of Pastaza are protected by the Ceibo Alliance. But the unfortunate thing is that, after so much effort behind this land and saving the climate, they are the victims of climate change in the first place. It is sadder that their views and perspectives do not receive due consideration at climate summits and international weather debates. I firmly believe that Our Mother Earth Will Be A Much Better Place To Live When Indigenous People’s Views Are Duly Taken Into Account In International And Other Climate Debates. The government must take the necessary steps to create a platform that allows them to speak from their point of view with the world about their problems and solutions to the climate crisis.

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  • British Council.jpg adaptable_memory | Faujdarhat Cadet College | Bangladesh
    15 Oct 2021

    Everyone is talking about the 'Effect of climate change on indigenous people'. But one more issue is still remaining underrated. We are forgetting that, along with the people, the domestic animals are suffering way too much.

    In our country Bangladesh, several acres of occupied lands are lost every year due to river erosion. The indigenous people are the main victim of it. Hundreds of them lose their lives, thousands lose their home and along with that, thousands of domestic animals are dying and livestock are being destroyed. But very less people are bothering about the domestic animals and their deaths, even though they behold a pretty good portion in our lives. It's observed that, the people living in the coastal areas, they were mostly engaged with agriculture and agriculture related work. Where domestic animals and livestock's used to be congenial ingredient of their livelihood. Losing them, when they shift to somewhere else, they run out of jobs and residence. The domestic animals which used to be a mean of their earning, losing them is more likely a curse to them due to this climate crisis.

    So, I firmly believe that alongside working for the indigenous people, we must address the issue of these domestic animals and livestock's. I'm also leaving a question to Mr. Hernann, "Are you also thinking about these animals and livestock's along with you people and everyone like you? The way we are considered to be a part of the living world, so are they."

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  • British Council.jpg daring_musician | Rangpur Cadet College | Bangladesh
    16 Oct 2021

    After watching Hernán's answers, I learned that the indigenous people have a lot to contribute to global politics, economy and environmental well-being.

    This is important because without Hernán's reports on the indigenous people of his country, it would have been nearly impossible for us to know about the vastness of their knowledge and culture.

    I would like to find out more about the culture and traditions of the indigenous people of my country, Bangladesh. I want to learn more about their agricultural practices and know the effects of Climate change on their lifestyles and habitat.

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  • British Council.jpg persuasive_situation | Prep A Girls School | Occupied Palestinian Territory
    16 Oct 2021

    After watching Hernan's answers, I learned that indigenous peoples are very connected in their own country. However, indigenous peoples are increasingly being forced to migrate while some are fleeing violence, conflict or degradation caused by climate change, and their voices are not heard in the decisions of the Cop26 Summit. Although they are the most affected by the climate
    We have a role in this, helping them, their voices being heard, and they can actively participate in Cop26 decisions.

    This is important because it is an opportunity to consider the challenges facing these peoples and the ways available to move forward in reviving their identities and encouraging them to protect their rights.

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  • British Council.jpg trustworthy_orangutan | Mymensingh Girls Cadet College | Bangladesh
    17 Oct 2021

    After watching Hernán's answers, I learned that-"Climate change is having a significant impact on the day to day existence of indigenous people as their life is directly dependent on the skies and the seasons,they are losing their spiritual connection to forests and medicine people in the face of these changes and affecting their traditional balance with the natural world."
    This is the most important because,indigenous peoples are caretakers of Mother Earth and realize and respect her gifts of water, air and fire. First Nations peoples' have a special relationship with the earth and all living things in it. Although,they will suffer more because of their deep connection to the land. The increased negative effects of climate change are also directly related to oppression and poverty and other issues caused by colonialism. This is because indigenous peoples have experienced a series of traumatic invasions.70–80 per cent5 of the more than 370 million indigenous peoples6 worldwide are spread across Asia and the Pacific, a region particularly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change.Irrespective of their vulnerability,according to Hernán the participation of the indigenous people was never a priority to the international organizations.
    The potential threat of climate change to indigenous peoples’ very existence combined with various legal and institutional barriers, which affect their ability to cope with and adapt to climate change, makes climate change an issue of human rights and inequality to indigenous peoples.Indigenous peoples who choose or are forced to migrate away from their traditional lands often face double discrimination as both migrants and as indigenous peoples. Indigenous peoples may be more vulnerable to irregular migration such as trafficking and smuggling due to sudden displacement by a climactic event, limited legal migration options and limited opportunities to make informed choices.particularly in developing countries, is pushing indigenous families to migrate to cities for economic reasons, often ending up in urban slums.On the other hand, Indigenous people who have different social, economic and political practices are considered to be misfits in the situation of globalisation. As a result, they are marginalised and harmed by globalisation.
    On the other hand, their young generation is also caught up in the technological revolution losing their cultural identity but they want to educate the world that another way of life is possible ,living with our natural environment is possible identity ,educate the world, how we have to change our way of interaction with the natural resources,how we should value ancestral indigenous cultures.Through Ceibo Alliance,they are trying be together to confront the great pressure that they face ,they are preparing their youth generation to represent and protect their cultural values,strengthen their young leader to uphold their values and identity.So we need to rethink the effects of globalization on the indigenous people and ensure that we can foster a model of development that doesn't exclude indigenous people,so that they are also benefitted,in a way that is compatible with their way of life and values for what they are fighting for.


    I would like to find more about the approaches of the world leaders towards the protectors of the nature-the indigenous people so that they don't feel left out and what should be done to make them adapt to their new way of life in the face of these changes without losing their cultural identity.

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    1. tom Tom @ Topical Talk
      trustworthy_orangutan's comment 18 Oct 2021

      You've looked at several different points of view by using the words "on the other hand", trustworthy_orangutan. This shows you're listening to other points of view and being open-minded. Well done!

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  • British Council.jpg wondrous_flight | Beit Hanoun Prep Girls A School | Occupied Palestinian Territory
    17 Oct 2021

    In our country Palestine, trees and soil are exposed to extinction due to the occupation that destroyed groundwater and exploited rain and river water for drinking and did not care for plants. The rare trees in the world will be reduced in Palestine.
    I want to ask Hernan, "How do we deliver our message to the world?"

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  • British Council.jpg victorious_library | Sylhet Cadet College | Bangladesh
    18 Oct 2021

    After watching Hernán's answers, I learned that "Unity is always Strength" but at the same time to be united, we badly need a great leader/organizer like Hernán .Through out his speech I was just amazed with the way he thought and described all the answers and perspectives. His discussion really made me understand how the indigenous people are deprived of their sole rights like education, freedom of speech, participation in politics. And more alarmingly the indigenious people are actually going through a international negligence all over the world including Ecuador.

    This is important because ,Youngs like me who are involved with topical talk will also get to know how to come up with the truth or fact and make people aware about what are the rights and responsibilities they deserve, when their voices are not heard of, even if they are absolutely right and working for the betterment of humanity!

    I would like to find out more about the people who stand out for the betterment of planet earth, specially in the environmental issues like climate change or global warming.

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  • British Council.jpg affable_opinion | Pabna Cadet College | Bangladesh
    18 Oct 2021

    In the wake of watching Hernan's answers what I discovered that this environment emergency is currently turned into an emergency of culture and governmental issues and became more acquainted with that they have been power to move from their places and some of the time they need to free the way of life of their predecessors .in some cases the environment emergency is turning into the reason for political distress and many individuals are loosing their lives . frequently we talk about immature or agricultural nations however they are the genuine victim.

    it is especially significant on the grounds that we need to pay attention to them and need to remain with them and assemble the help of the world.if their voice is heard then the rest ethnic gatherings will approach and represent their rights.also they can figure out how to adapt to the circumstance .

    I might want to affectionate that how we can inspire individuals to come to remain with them and we can accomplish for individuals who lost their things and persuade them to begin newly

    Reports demonstrate that huge number of individuals all throughout the planet will be compelled to migrate because of rising oceans, floods, dry seasons and tempests. While this would influence people around the world, the effect would be lopsidedly unbalanced to native people groups in areas like the Arctic and the Pacific. Indeed, inability to make a move by neighborhood entertainers can lead not exclusively to the obliteration of their properties yet in addition to decimation for them all in all. Native people groups identify with their environment. One of the native gatherings in Hawaii, the Maoli, for instance, accept that they are truly identified with every one of the regular things found on the island of the archipelago. Then again, Westerners tend not to recognize the land where they possess, however to characterize themselves based on their occupation. Eventually, native people groups are the most influenced by environmental change, and the 2009 World Indigenous Summit Report on Climate Change shows the pessimistic effects they face in 7 locales all throughout the planet

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    1. tom Tom @ Topical Talk
      affable_opinion's comment 18 Oct 2021

      How can we inspire individuals to take action on this, affable_opinion?

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  • British Council.jpg quirky_sheep | Faujdarhat Cadet College | Bangladesh
    18 Oct 2021

    I have listened to what Mr. Hernán wanted to say and learned about the situation and prospects of the 'Ceibo Alliance'. And I have learned many things from the story of Mr. Hernán.

    First of ALL, THE SUFFERINGS OF INDIGENOUS PEOPLE DUE TO CLIMATE CHANGE AND THE BIASED FORM OF GOVERNMENT.

    Well, according to Mr. John Magrath, the program researcher at Oxfam,

    "Minorities tend to live in the more marginal areas, exposed areas, that seem to be seeing more climate changes and are more susceptible to climate impacts because they have got less, and get less, from governments. It is a characteristic of all the studies that I have seen, that the ethnic communities are the people who suffer most from climate impacts and are the most vulnerable".
    According to the Minority Rights Group International climate briefing, Discrimination and disadvantage harm indigenous people at every stage, including in the aftermath of climate-related disasters and during official planning at the local, national, and international levels for coping with current and future climate change impacts. So basically, the indigenous people suffer the worst in the case of climate change. But despite all that, they are neglected, avoided, and excluded from society, and silenced by their own government. This discrimination finally results in great loss of LANDS, LIVESTOCK & LIVES AS WELL! So the discrimination makes it more worse for the indigenous communities who are prone to climate change impacts.

    Next, THE SELF-RESP[ECT AND DIGNITY FOR OWN IDENTITY.

    In my opinion, the most touching and inspiring thing Mr. Hernán quoted was,
    "THOUGH OUR VOICES WERE SILENCED BY OUR OWN GOVERNMENT, WE HAVE OUR OWN STORY OF STRUGGLES, RICH CULTURES & DIGNITY FOR OUR IDENTITY. THAT'S WHY IN A COMMON PERSPECTIVE & A COMMON OBJECTIVE, WE STOOD TOGETHER TO PROTECT THEM ALL BY OVERCOMING ALL THE OBSTACLES THERE WERE".

    I think all the people in the world should hear this message out as I believe every nation, every community &every race has its own identity, culture & history. But often, in the long run, we forget them all. So, we all should get motivated and inspired by the following message of Mr. Hernán Payaguaje and work together to protect the cultures, history & identity we have avoiding every possible obstacle there could be.

    So that's what I have learned from the story of Mr. Hernán and the CEIBO ALLIANCE.

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    1. tom Tom @ Topical Talk
      quirky_sheep's comment 18 Oct 2021

      This shows a real determination to find out more about the plight of indigenous peoples, quirky_sheep, and your quote from John McGrath adds weight to your point. You set an excellent example to other students!

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  • British Council.jpg serious_camel | Faujdarhat Cadet College | Bangladesh
    18 Oct 2021

    It's obvious that climatic change effects the political and cultural view of the people . As like Hermains we also live in a country where the effect of climatic changes becoming dangerous day by day. Due to river eroision people have to change their living places . People from riverside are rushing towards the city that's making the population of the city dense which is also effecting the job market and the law and order situation as they are coming loosing their job. The government has to come up with solution about what to do with this people who are loosing their livelihood and living places due to river eroison or other issues

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  • British Council.jpg free_river | Faujdarhat Cadet College | Bangladesh
    19 Oct 2021

    After watching Hernán's answers, I learned that how Indigenous peoples are adapting the survival procedure so fast and they are introducing a lot of new ways to cope with the environment .
    This is important because the world is getting worse day by day and we can know about their ways and we can teach them about the technologies and how to use them and make their life better and also a good future for our world.
    I would like to find out more about their agriculture system as they have to shift their places or have to face extreme weather so how they are maintaining these things and what kind of help we normal people can do in their this case.

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  • British Council.jpg glad_eel | Prep A Girls School | Occupied Palestinian Territory
    19 Oct 2021

    After watching Hernán's answers, I learned that... ​
    discussions of the country's indigenous people are always hidden by governments, despite the love they try to show their countryThis is important because..I would like to find out more about...
    The amount of determination they carried in That time to improve their lives and adapt to them despite all the challenges and hardships they faced

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  • British Council.jpg victorious_contribution | Rangpur Cadet College | Bangladesh
    19 Oct 2021

    After listening to Hernan's answers, I realized that indigenous and tribal people are the least contributing to climate change but receiving the most of the atrocities caused by it. I think it is unfair and we owe them a big compensation for this. It is tragic to hear about their condition since they are different from the fast moving world of globalization and modernization and even in such a world they are upholding their cultures and heritages, which many societies have failed to. I share my immense respect and love for their people, their works and also for the consequences they are facing. I hope the best for Ceibo Alliance that they will successfully reach their goal and serve their purposes.

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  • British Council.jpg enlightened_queen | Start-Rite Schools | Nigeria
    19 Oct 2021

    After watching Hernan answers, I learnt that through honesty and transparency, we need to have a common voice for the common good of our community.

    This is important because there will always be opposition to the goal of protecting the environment and the only way to surmount challenges is to be united in voice and purpose.

    I would like to find out more about what the United Nations in particular is doing (specifically) to ensure that large corporations are not suppressing the voices of the people under study. I believe their voices need to be heard and action needs to be taken.

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    1. tom Tom @ Topical Talk
      enlightened_queen's comment 19 Oct 2021

      This sounds a good area to research. Can you let us know what you find out?

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  • British Council.jpg quirky_sheep | Faujdarhat Cadet College | Bangladesh
    19 Oct 2021

    Mr. Hernán said
    "As neglected by the government & excluded from the society, we did not have knowledge about the technology & could not cope up with the world. But as we understand the significance of technological advancement now, we are moving forward to technological advancement in the daily aspects of our life".
    Well, indigenous people often do not have opportunities to move forward to technological advancement. But it's important for them to understand the significance of technology in daily life. Mr. Hernán also said that they are using & training their men to use technological devices & tools in daily life activities such as drones, cameras, land patrols etc. Such steps will surely enhance their lifestyle in 2-3 years and help them cope up with the rest of the world. That will also force the government to hear the indigenous communities out and give them proper rights they deserve.
    I think all the indigenous people in the third world countries should hear this message & get motivated to change their perspectives & views to technological advancement & enhance their lifestyle to work together in protecting their identity, culture & dignity as proud members of indigenous community.

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    1. Olivia-Avatar.jpg Olivia @ Topical Talk
      quirky_sheep's comment 19 Oct 2021

      Great listening shown here, quirky_sheep. Well done!

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  • British Council.jpg poetic_coconut | Sylhet Cadet College | Bangladesh
    19 Oct 2021

    I learned from Hernán's answers that Indigenous peoples have a strong spiritual bond with their lands and resources. Indigenous peoples, on the other hand, are increasingly being forced to migrate, with some being displaced or relocated without their consent, and others fleeing the violence, conflict, or degradation caused by climate change. Their voices are not heard in the Cop26 summit decisions, despite the fact that they are the most affected by climate change.
    As a result, we must all rally behind them so that their opinions are heard and they can This is significant because it provides an opportunity to explore the issues that these peoples face, as well as the options for moving forward in resurrecting their identities and urging them to safeguard their rights outside of their traditional areas and in their ancestral homeland.
    I'd like to learn more about how they dealt with those problems and what difficult decisions they had to make in order for their voices to be heard around the world.properly participate in Cop26 choices.

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  • British Council.jpg funny_recipe | Sylhet Cadet College | Bangladesh
    20 Oct 2021

    Hernan's project has changed the lives of his own people, and it has the potential to transform the lives of other indigenous peoples around the world. Because of their reliance on and intimate contact with the environment and its resources, indigenous peoples are among the first to experience the direct effects of climate change. Indigenous peoples are crucial to and active in the numerous ecosystems that occupy their lands and territories, and hence may be able to help these ecosystems become more resilient. Villagers in Bangladesh are developing floating vegetable gardens to protect their livelihoods from flooding, while communities in Vietnam are assisting in the planting of dense mangroves along the coast to help diffuse tropical storm waves. Adapting to new circumstances frequently necessitates additional financial resources and the transfer of technological capacity that most indigenous people lack.

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  • British Council.jpg admirable_maths | Sylhet Cadet College | Bangladesh
    20 Oct 2021

    After watching hernan's answers I came to learn about his dear respect towards his community and motherland.Not only he is concerned about protecting it but also he would not agree to compromise their rights in any cost.Reports show that many indigenous people are being forced to relocate as their traditional lands become uninhabitable due to climate change. ... In Kenya, where desertification is changing grazing routes, nomadic indigenous groups such as the Maasai and Oromo, are being forced to move to the cities,the same has been done to hernan's people.But they do the opposite to get these results as Indigenous peoples are the best guardians of global biodiversity. More than 20 per cent of the carbon stored in forests is found in land managed by indigenous peoples, preserving vital carbon pools which continuously capture CO2 and release oxygen into the atmosphere, thereby reducing climate change impacts. While Indigenous Peoples own, occupy, or use a quarter of the world's surface area, they safeguard 80% of the world's remaining biodiversity.As harnen has already said "Our voices have been silenced by governments and companies in the industries that feel threatened by the messages that we bring."But the indigenous peoples' observations contribute importantly to advancing climate science, by ensuring that assessments of climate change impacts and policies for climate change adaptation are meaningful and applicable at the local level.That's why we should respect the knowledge of indigenous people regarding the climate change to get advanced solutions in the near future.

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  • British Council.jpg adaptable_memory | Faujdarhat Cadet College | Bangladesh
    21 Oct 2021

    The efforts that Mr. Hernan is putting everyday is really appreciable. One of the most important points he mentioned, was about education. He said that only because of the lack of education and knowledge in terms of climate change impacts, the indigenous people face greater trouble which is driven by their indigenous knowledge and lack of technology. They are being underestimated every time by the government and other people of the country only because their lagging behind in education. But it's not their fault. the governments of the country is responsible for ensuring education for everyone in every place. But many countries are underrating or excluding the indigenous people from all such facilities. Indigenous people are also to be provided with proper rights and facilities. They are no one different from us. They do have the right to get the same benefits that we have as the citizens of our country.

    Every government must ensure their proper education and other facilitates. Hernan's message shows how important it is for the government to ensure the PROPER EDUCATION and AWARENESS PROGRAMS in the areas of indigenous communities and organise TRAINING PROGRAMS for them with proper management, instead of underestimating them or excluding them from the count

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  • British Council.jpg considerate_tsunami | Barishal Cadet College | Bangladesh
    21 Oct 2021

    The thing I got to know from his speech is that Ethnic peoples have a strong spiritual bond with their lands and resources . They compare them to their mother sometimes. Ethnic peoples, on the other hand, are being forced to migrate, and getting involved with conflict or degradation caused by climate change. They are not heard but are one of the most affected by the climate change . As a result the are being the victims. They are only behind resurrecting their identities and urging them to safeguard their rights outside of their traditional areas and in their ancestral homeland . COP26 should consider these sort of indigenous people.

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  • British Council.jpg adept_fact | Rajshahi Cadet College | Bangladesh
    21 Oct 2021

    The first thing I did after seeing these videos was question myself how come I forgot the sufferings of these indigenous people due to climate change. We only think about underdeveloped or developing countries but hardly look at the real victims of climate change who would lose their culture, land, and ancestral connections for it.
    Thanks to Harnan's answers I could rectify my thinking and came to realize how many people like myself are ignoring these issues. There are many indigenous tribes in our country also who cant show their opinions or don't even know about climate change and its problems. Even if they show it, the media always overlooks these opinions. I finally feel like I can stand for them and help them raise their voices.

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  • British Council.jpg appreciative_pear | Shouka Prep Girls School | Occupied Palestinian Territory
    23 Oct 2021

    Climate change has a significant impact on indigenous peoples in particular. Increasing their knowledge of the areas in which they live, their role in combating climate change is of great importance. Indigenous peoples are present everywhere in the world. A large percentage of indigenous peoples still live in harmony with nature, whether in the Arctic or forests, but it is not considered the only reason for focusing They have to discuss the climate debate. Several reports have indicated that indigenous peoples are affected and suffering from climate change, but are there ways or ways to combat climate change?

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  • British Council.jpg productive_temperature | Faujdarhat Cadet College | Bangladesh
    24 Oct 2021

    After watching Hernán's answers, I learned that the indigenous communities are suffering a lot due this climate change.They are the ones living in the nature.They have been living in nature and cultivating it in the footsteps of their forefathers, keeping the earth green and preventing climate change.However, indigenous people are suffering major issues as a result of political and certain government decisions motivated by a desire for gain.

    This is important because not only are those who are assisting in the fight against climate change being tortured, but their lengthy heritage is also being lost as they are deported from their homeland.Such actions also jeopardize their future generations, culminating in a significant loss of their long-standing heritage.

    I'd want to learn more about how to assist these individuals so that they can continue to contribute to the fight against climate change and obtain suitable shelter, since they, too, are human beings who deserve to live a happy life.They are, nevertheless, far more likely to suffer than the rest of us who are in danger.

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