What's it like to be arrested on a protest? ...and other questions!

We're absolutely delighted to bring you our interview with Indigo Rumbelow, part of the campaigns team at Extinction Rebellion. Indigo has been a part of a number of civil disobedience campaigns in the UK and she tells us all about her experiences. We're really grateful for Indigo stepping in at the last minute when she found out Robin Boardman could no longer make it. We'll let Indigo introduce herself!


How did you start doing protests and why and what motivated and inspired you?
approachable_panther, Manor Park Primary Academy and sceptical_rock, Preston Manor School


What is the largest Extinction Rebellion protest to take place in the UK and when did it happen?
extraordinary_cymbals, Penketh Primary School

April 2019 was the first time Extinction Rebellion became a word that everyone had heard about. We blocked Waterloo Bridge ...with a stage and a garden of trees... and had a pink boat at Oxford Circus, and we had a camp at Marble Arch!

Indigo Rumbelow


Do you think that the protest has to be disruptive or violent for your voice to be heard and do small protests make a change?
daring_forest, Willowtown Community Primary School


How do you think Extinction Rebellion's protests are impacting society?
comfortable_chemistry, Michael Faraday School


Have you ever had a counter-group or resistance to your protests, and if so, how did you tackle them?
reflective_artic_fox, Hammond Junior School


Bonus question: What's it like to be arrested on a protest?
Tom @ the BNC

It can be quite scary and quite a difficult experience but if you know what's going to happen then you're going to feel a bit more calm if it does happen

Indigo Rumbelow

A big thank you to Indigo for such brilliant answers!

  • Which answer did you learn the most from?
  • Did anything surprise you?
  • How important is the work of Extinction Rebellion?

Add your comments below!

Comments (11)

  • Hammond School logo loving_snail | Hammond Junior School F
    05 Feb 2021

    this is really interesting

    Reply to this comment
    1. indigo.jpg EXPERT: Indigo Rumbelow
      loving_snail's comment 23 Feb 2021

      Thanks loving snail!

      Reply to this comment
  • Hammond School logo helpful_sparrow | Hammond Junior School B
    05 Feb 2021

    wow this is a lot of info thanks Indigo

    Reply to this comment
    1. indigo.jpg EXPERT: Indigo Rumbelow
      helpful_sparrow's comment 23 Feb 2021

      Hi helpful_sparrow, Do you learn much about climate change at school? Do you know any school strikers?

      Reply to this comment
  • Upton-Cross-logo-250x250.jpg shining_journalist | Upton Cross Primary School | United Kingdom
    07 Feb 2021

    Wow this topic is really interesting as it opens up what does it feel like to protest on the streets and also you can learn so much things about it like do you need to have a big enough voice to make a change.

    Reply to this comment
    1. indigo.jpg EXPERT: Indigo Rumbelow
      shining_journalist's comment 23 Feb 2021

      thank's shining_journalist! I believe we all have a voice big enough to make change!

      Reply to this comment
  • Hammond School logo emotional_night | Hammond Junior School F
    10 Feb 2021

    I think what you are doing Indigo Rumbelow is totally right because it is important to for everybody to get a say and reflect upon the government's rules and if they are not going to let you ask nicely then protest is the way to go! I have always wanted to contribute to helping our planet revitalize back to full health once more and have looked at the Extinction Rebellion for help, support and leadership. It seems to me that growing up in this disgusting mess of what what was once a beautiful planet with animals of all sorts and it is only us that destroyed it but there is still a chance to save our planet before anything else happens if all humanity stops in their tracks and turns around. I think that the government shouldn't be doing all these revolting things to our world as nature has given us live food and drink so what more could we want. Nature has given to us and all we do in return is take more e.g. the stuff that hasn't been given to us.
    Space also gives a lot... but there's good sides and bad sides:
    The amount we get out of space is huge and we might spend a lot but it is still only half a percent(0.5%) of the annual US Budget and about 50% of the remaining money is wasted and it's not exactly going to help space exploration eating MacDonald's and dyeing of lung cancer from smoking, is it? We should in vest more money in this life saving thing as it the key to saving our beloved planet and we can find new ways as it is totally human to be curious.
    On the other hand, people may that it is an excuse to be purely careless about our planet, stop bothering about it and we can go out and find another planet to put ​in the bin and move on once more after that. We could spend money on shelters fresh and clean food and water instead so why explore space?
    We need to explore space because it gives up water purification facilities, solar energy, which helps save he planet, ​GPS, which allows us to navigate to other countries to give them what they need, weather satellites, LEDs, home insulation, wireless headsets, that allow us to communicate, persevered food, computer mice, fire alarms, which stop us dyeing from fires in the middle of the night, and loads more vital thing that help us live. It can also mean less money is spent.
    Poorer countries don't always get all the benefits that are made from space, which makes it a bit pointless in the end and getting into space is hard, so much time and effort goes into it and so doesn't that ​go to show that it's no big benefit in the end?
    Emotional_Nightxx
    P.S. you should see the amount of nature posters there are on my bedroom walls!!!

    Reply to this comment
    1. tom Tom @ Topical Talk
      emotional_night's comment 11 Feb 2021

      A very in-depth response! Can you link spae back to the topic we are studying now? You might be interested in reading some of our space conversations last year whenit was one of our Issues! https://burnetnewsclub.com/issues/space-exploration/

      Reply to this comment
    2. indigo.jpg EXPERT: Indigo Rumbelow
      emotional_night's comment 23 Feb 2021

      Thanks emotional_night, I agree with you! Although so much has been destroyed, it's important that we act now to stop the worst effects of climate breakdown, and this will involve our whole civilisation focusing on how they can reduce their impacts, as well as the governemt making tough regulations to bring emissions down. Do you think it's more important to focus on exploring space, or stopping the worst effects of the climate crisis?

      Reply to this comment
  • Hammond School logo emotional_night | Hammond Junior School F
    10 Feb 2021

    As I have just said you sound great Indigo but about the coal mine - I don't agree with building it near peoples houses but we need coal to put in furnaces for melting down iron ore to get iron ingots and steel and steel is used for so many different things it will not stop being melted down. You could use wood instead but that burns quicker so lots of trees will need to be cut down for that, which isn't good for the environment, so unless you get it imported, which needs either a plane or container ships that aren't good for the environment and still send off smoke, we need coal mines. And also the protest fires send off smoke too and other things you do even like transport to get there are similar which means the protests aren't always going to be eco. It kind of says no one can be completely eco but we can try really super hard to do so!

    Reply to this comment
    1. tom Tom @ Topical Talk
      emotional_night's comment 11 Feb 2021

      Thank you for speaking up with your opinion, emotional_night. Are there other more eco-friendly ways to make energy that are not coal?

      Reply to this comment

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